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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Statistics

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | School of Business and Economics | Statistics | News | Paper "Pedestrian exposure to black carbon and PM 2.5 emissions in urban hot spots: New findings using mobile measurement techniques and flexible Bayesian regression models" by Alas et al. is accepted by JESEE

Paper "Pedestrian exposure to black carbon and PM 2.5 emissions in urban hot spots: New findings using mobile measurement techniques and flexible Bayesian regression models" by Alas et al. is accepted by JESEE

The paper "Pedestrian exposure to black carbon and PM 2.5 emissions in urban hot spots: New findings using mobile measurement techniques and flexible Bayesian regression models" by H.D. Alas, A. Stöcker, N. Umlauf, O. Senaweera, S. Pfeifer, S. Greven, and A. Wiedensohler has been accepted by Journal Of Exposure Science And Environmental Epidemiology.

 

Background: Data from extensive mobile measurements (MM) of air pollutants provide spatially resolved information on pedestrians’ exposure to particulate matter (black carbon (BC) and PM 2.5 mass concentrations).

Objective: We present a distributional regression model in a Bayesian framework that estimates the effects of spatiotemporal factors on the pollutant concentrations influencing pedestrian exposure.

Methods: We modelled the mean and variance of the pollutant concentrations obtained from MM in two cities and extended commonly-used lognormal models with a lognormal-normal convolution(logNNC) extension for BC to account for instrument measurement error.

Results: The logNNC extension significantly improved the BC model. From these model results, we found local sources and, hence, local mitigation efforts to improve air quality, have more impact on the ambient levels of BC mass concentrations than on the regulated PM 2.5 .

Significance: Firstly, this model (logNNC in bamlss package available in R) could be used for the statistical analysis of MM data from various study areas and pollutants with the potential for predicting pollutant concentrations in urban areas. Secondly, with respect to pedestrian exposure, it is crucial for BC mass concentration to be monitored and regulated in areas dominated by traffic-related air pollution.